Slow Roasted Duck Laksa

image_pdfimage_print

IMG_6047

 

I am quite certain that in Malaysia, Laksa is a fairly typical dish with not too many variations.  Not so in the Em’s Food for Friends test kitchen!!  I really impressed the TKD’s*  with this version and a couple of ring-ins as well.  The duck was the definite highlight in this little ensemble as it was cooked low and slow to create the perfect, succulent, juicy addition to the spicy, noodle-laden broth.  Winner, winner, duck dinner!!

 

To speed up the chopping process, you can place your lemongrass, chilli, ginger and garlic in a small processor and give it a whazz or if you were lucky enough to win the Turbo Chef……perfect!

 

Prep time:  30  Minutes                         Cooking time:  1 Hour                          $$  Medium Budget

 

Serves 6

 

4 boneless duck breasts, trimmed of any excess fat

1 tbs of yellow curry paste

1 tbs of peanut oil (olive or canola if you have an allergy)

 

For the Broth:

 

1 clove of garlic, finely minced

1 red chilli, finely chopped

2cm piece of ginger, grated

1 stalk of lemon grass, finely chopped (bruised and left whole is ok too, just discard at the end)

1 tbs of shrimp paste

3 tbs of yellow curry paste

1 litre of chicken stock

2 x 400gm tins of coconut milk

2 tbs of fish sauce

1 tbs of brown sugar

Juice of 1/2 a lime

1 cup of coriander leaves

1 bunch of baby bok choy, sliced

1 bunch of choy sum, sliced into 3cm batons

5 individual portions of dried egg noodles (I use Ayam brand, they look like 2 minute noodle cakes)

 

 

For the Garnish:

 

1 bag of bean sprouts

1 lebanese cucumber, chopped into little cubes

1 red chilli, finely sliced

Coriander sprigs

 

Pre heat the oven to 125°C

 

Score the skin of the duck breasts with a sharp knife at 1cm intervals diagonally, being careful not to penetrate the flesh.  Mix the curry paste and oil together in a small bowl. Place the duck breasts in a tray and using your hands, rub the curry paste into the breast fillets so they are fully coated in the paste.

 

Heat a large frypan until nice and hot and panfry the breast fillets for 5-6 minutes on the skin side and then turn and fry the underside for 1 minute.  Place the breasts back on a clean tray and bake them in the oven for 50- minutes.  Remove from the oven and cover with foil to keep warm.

 

While the duck is in the oven you can make your broth.  Heat a little oil in a large soup pot and add the garlic, ginger, chilli and lemongrass.  Stir fry for 1-2 minutes or until fragrant and then add the shrimp paste and curry paste.  Stir continuously, breaking down the shrimp paste with the back of your spoon.  Don’t worry if it doesn’t dissolve fully, it will when you add the liquid.

 

Pour in the stock, coconut milk, fish sauce and lime juice and stir to combine.  Bring the mixture to the boil and add the sugar.  Allow to simmer for 15-20 minutes with the lid off.  Add the vegetables and coriander right before serving so your veggies maintain their crunch and colour.

 

Bring a pot of water to the boil and cook the noodles for 2 minutes or until just starting to separate.  Drain and rinse and divide between 6 large laksa bowls.  Don’t worry if they cool down slightly, the hot broth will heat them up.

 

To serve, spoon the broth and vegetables over the noodles.  Slice the duck breasts on the diagonal in 1 cm slices and top each mound of noodles with 4-5 slices.  Place a handful of bean shoots, a scattering of cucumber and some chilli slices and then top each bowl with a sprig of coriander.  Serve with lime wedges if you like.

 

*Test Kitchen Dummies

Share this:
 

Comments

  1. Jodie McGrath says

    Hi Em, the dish sounds divine, but rather than using duck breasts, I have a whole frozen duck and was hoping to use that.? Any thoughts?

    Thanks Jodie

    • Em says

      Hi Jodie, whole roasted would be awesome and then cut up ‘chinese style’. You could still baste it in the curry paste and cook it in a low oven, I think but I would probably google “whole slow roasted duck” to check temperatures and length of time and then “chopping a duck chinese style”. I am sure there would be a you tube video that would have a demo. Cheers Em x

  2. Emma says

    Just amazing! The flavours in that laksa were perfect. I burned my duck a little bit it didn’t even seem to matter – just gave it a nice charred flavour 🙂 and it looks great on the plate – better than what they’re putting up on Masterchef on the tv haha. Cheers Em!

    • Emma says

      Thanks for your comment Mary, sorry for the late reply, the email went to my Junk folder which i rarely check. Cheers Em

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *